Borough of Durham

The territory that became known as County Durham, originally a liberty under the control of the Bishops of Durham, had various names: the “Liberty of Durham”, “Liberty of St Cuthbert’s Land” “the lands of St. Cuthbert between Tyne and Tees” or “the Liberty of Haliwerfolc”.12

The bishops’ special jurisdiction rested on claims that King Ecgfrith of Northumbria had granted a substantial territory to St Cuthbert on his election to the see of Lindisfarne in 684. In about 883 a cathedral housing the saint’s remains was established at Chester-le-Street and Guthfrith, King of York granted the community of St Cuthbert the area between the Tyne and the Wear. In 995 the see moved again – to Durham.

Following the Norman invasion, the administrative machinery of government extended only slowly into northern England. In the twelfth century a shire or county of Northumberland was formed[by whom?], with Durham regarded as within its bounds.13 However the bishops disputed the authority of the sheriff of Northumberland and his officials.

Sadberge was a liberty, sometimes referred to as a county, within Northumberland. In 1189 it was purchased for the see but continued with a separate sheriff, coroner and court of pleas. In the 14th century Sadberge was included in Stockton ward and was itself divided into two wards. The division into the four wards of Chester-le-Street, Darlington, Easington and Stockton existed in the 13th century, each ward having its own coroner and a three-weekly court corresponding to the hundred court. The diocese was divided into the archdeaconries of Durham and Northumberland. The former is mentioned in 1072.

Co Durham
Gaming Environment

Borough of Durham

Mythen Keep (Ars Magica 5) BlacknBlueKnight